2013 Featured Artist:  Joy Morgan Newberry

Originally from a small town called Mars, just north of Pittsburgh, PA, Joy Morgan Newberry was raised in a simultaneously rural and urban environment.   Raised in a family with a strong emphasis on learning and self-development, she grew up with a love for education, but especially the humanities.  An artist in high school, both in the visual and performing arts, she strove to pursue this love as a lifelong profession.  This is what brought her to architecture, seeing it as a collaboration of the arts and sciences, it was an ideal fit.
 

Still, one rarely knows what architecture is when they enter into a program.  Joy excelled in this learning environment, which opens the eyes of students to the 

 

world of possibilities before them.  These values, of architecture as a public good are what Joy is passionate about and strives to create in her career ahead.
 

She has been an active member of Architecture for Humanity, as well as AIAS, where she served as the 2011-2012 Freedom by Design Director, and participated on a NAAB accreditation team in 2012.
           
​She received her Bachelors of Arts in Architecture from Clemson University in May, 2012, and is now pursuing her M. Arch, also at Clemson.

You may contact Joy at:  joy.morgan.newberry@gmail.com
Check out her website and portfolio here:  http://joymorgannewberry.wix.com/me

 

Shadow Box - Janet Marie Smith
Shadow Box
Shadow Box

Final Piece

Shadow Box
Shadow Box

One of the first things Joy did was disassembled a baseball. She used her camera to take photos that were manipulated to compose the final piece.

Shadow Box
Shadow Box

Final piece - showing the thickness of the piece and layers used for the composition.

Shadow Box
Shadow Box

The first manipulation of the baseball photographs.

The concept for this shadow box was to approach baseball from a point of view that would get to the essence of the sport. At it's heart, it is as simple as having a ball and a bat, which can be played by anyone, anywhere. The beauty is in the simplicity of elements which then become a much more complex and engaging. This box aims to speak to this; the derivation of the form came from the simplest of items: string from the heart of a baseball. By slicing into it, it revealed the layers within even this most basic piece of equipment for the sport. Spatial relationships were then extrapolated from the string of the ball, which were manipulated and layered to create a depth of layers for the final shadow box.